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   Meriden to Receive Electric Generating Plant
   House Recognizes Connecticut-Massachusetts Trail
   Winsted High School to Receive Solar Technology
   Focus the Nation Lectures are Spurring Environmental Action
   Septic System Overhaul Receives Financial Support
   Trail to be Constructed in Elmwood Area of West Hartford
   Seven Power Plants to be Built Throughout State
   Companies to Pay for Water Contamination
   New Campus to Incorporate Green Technology
   Alternative Energy Projects to Receive Funding
   Town’s Industrial Park Closer to Receiving Wind Power
   Active Oil Fined for Storing Contaminated Waste Oil
   Cornwall and Canaan to Receive Open Space
   Vernon School Oil Tanks Need Replacement
   Contract to Expire With Trash Plant
   Plainville to House New Biomass Power Plant
   Rates Cut by Connecticut Electric Supplier
   New Haven Supports Carbon Cap
   Wallingford to Invest in Energy Cooperative
   Protected Land to be Bought by State
   Land Needed for Wastewater Treatment
   Schools to Receive Energy- and Cost-Friendly Plants
   Norwich Looks to Clean Contaminated Plot
   Unwarranted Fines Levied Against Stamford
   Single-Stream Recycling Hits East Coast
   Hearing to be Held Regarding Wood-Burning Plant
   Board of Selectmen Approves Energy Conservation Committee
   Open Space Initiative to go to Referendum
   Fledgling Environmental Group Elects Officers
   EPA Recognizes Excellent Air Quality at Ridgefield Schools
   Clean River Project Receives Donations
   Redding Receives Community Development Award
   Green Room Project for i.Park
   Barrels Finally Removed From Contaminated Waterbury Site
   Building Standards Guide Energy Conservation Efforts
   New Legislation Sets Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cap
   Reparations to be Paid for River Damage
   Coastal Trail to Receive State and Federal Funding
   Durham Residents Unfavorable to Proposed Grocery Store
   Glastonbury Bolsters its Eco-Friendly Dial-A-Ride Fleet
   Fairfield’s GE Energy sells $1 Billion in Wind Turbines
   United States Performs Poorly on Environmental Ranking
   Yale University Leader in Greenhouse Gas Reduction
   Green Cleaning Method to be Used in Milford Property
   New Eco Web site for Westport Residents
   Whole Foods to Discontinue Plastic Bags
   Bridgeport Power Plant Slated for Construction
   CECD to Conduct National Search for Brownfields Director
   What Was Won, What Was Lost
   State to Save Money and Increase Cleaner Greener Power
   Citizens Banks Announces Energy Efficiency Homeowner Loans
   National Law Firm Plans Eco-Friendly Office
   West Cornwell Store First in State to Retail Biodiesel
   One Fourth of U.S. Bird Species in Danger
   Direct Energy Launches Energy Contest
   Brothers Open Organic Restaurant
   Subway Takes Steps to Become More Eco-friendly
   Green Community Planned for Stamford
   Amenta/Emma Architects to Go Green
   Yale Opens Sustainable Café
   New Credentialing Organization Launched for Green Building Professionals
   How CT Legislators Vote on the Environment
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Agricultural and Biofuel News - ENN
Agricultural and Biofuel News - ENN

Agricultural and Biofuel News - ENN
  • University-led study looks to reduce methane gas emissions in cattle
    Seeking to mitigate the greenhouse gas contributions of the region’s agricultural sector, a University of Lethbridge-led study has been granted $1.1 million by the federal government’s Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Program.“Canadian farmers are great stewards of the land and the environment. These new investments are part of the government’s commitment to addressing climate change and ensuring our farmers are world leaders in the use and development of clean and sustainable technology and processes,” says Lawrence MacAulay, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food.

  • Looking back to move agriculture forward
    Small farmers and indigenous communities have practised sustainable agriculture for centuries. Chidi Oguamanam is working to ensure that traditional knowledge is recognized and shared equitably.The kind of clean technology Chidi Oguamanam advocates looks a lot different from what many of us might imagine. No high-tech solar panels. No futuristic gizmos. No scientists in a lab.

  • Dust particles in livestock facilities: Sweat the small stuff
    A beam of sunlight streams into your living room, illuminating a Milky Way of dust particles hanging in the air. Although the air looks thick, those visible dust particles are so big that they can’t reach the smallest branches of the respiratory tree in your lungs. It’s the dust we can’t see—smaller than 2.5 microns, called PM 2.5—that can cause allergies and other respiratory problems.

  • Conserve intact forest landscapes to maximize biodiversity, reduce extinction risk
    A new global analysis of forest habitat loss and wildlife extinction risk published today in the journal Nature shows that species most at risk live in areas just beginning to see the impacts of human activities such as hunting, mining, logging and ranching.

  • Climate change: Biodiversity rescues biodiversity in a warmer world
    The last month was recorded as the warmest June ever in many parts of the world. Last year, 2016, was the warmest year in the modern temperature record. Our planet is constantly heating up. This poses direct threats to humans, like extreme weather events and global sea-level rise, but scientists are concerned that it may also affect our well-being indirectly via changes in biodiversity. The variety of life, from plants and animals to microorganisms, is the basis of many services ecosystems provide to us, for example clean drinking water or food. Today, ecologists are challenged by the question: what does a warmer world mean for biodiversity? More species, less species, or no change?